The Importance of Tipping 20 Percent or More

Many are intrigued our family and our ministry tip 20 percent or more. Tipping in the US is different from other parts of the world. Yet in the US, tips make up most of the income a server receives in the restaurant industry.  Hourly, they earn a little over $2. Tips are their income. Tipping is also encouraged when certain services are rendered like delivery or hair styling. In this post, I am focusing on dining.

A good name is more desirable than riches. (Proverbs 22:1)

This proverb and value lead us to leave great tips. Our ministry and our family use debit or credit cards for almost all purchases. Each time our cards are given for a service, our name which is engraved on the card goes with it. Our name or our ministry’s name at that moment is synonymous with the tip. A bad tip equals a bad reputation. A good tip equals a good reputation but a great unforgettable tip equals a good name.

Additionally, excellence is our minimum standard.  If society shares gratuity should be 15 to 20 percent, our minimum should be at least 15 percent. Jesus said to go the extra mile. Going the extra mile is excellence at its best. We should go above and beyond when providing a tip.

As children, learning percentages can be difficult. As they grow, we allow them to ‘pay the bill’ (with our money though). This teaches them not only the importance of tipping but how to tip. Unfortunately, you can never escape math in life.

A person who knows how they should tip yet refuses is simply greedy. I never met anyone in the service industry whose service allowed them to live a luxurious life. Most are trying to make ends meet or using their tips to earn extra income. If you refuse to tip or tip generously, your pocket is more important than their’s. A person should be generous in their gratuity.

What if we get bad service? We still tip 20 percent or more. I assume the best of that person and no matter what, we still tip.  Marilyn pos Savant, American world record holder for having the highest IQ, is quoted to say all should know how and how much to tip people who expect gratuities, even in the case of poor service.

What if they comp a meal or provide one for free because there was an issue? I calculate in my head what the total amount would have been and tip based on that amount. It is not the fault of the server if the kitchen, restaurant, or manager got something wrong. It is not fair to cheat them.

What is gratuity is included? If it doesn’t meet 20 percent or more, we add more gratuity.

What if someone is paying for your meal including the tip? This can be tricky. I don’t want to place them on the spot or be rude. Karen and I enjoy entertaining others and paying for the bill including the tip is our usual standard. Usually those who treat us know our standard. I expect them to meet or exceed our leadership.  Yet, I have quietly left a tip while leaving the table without them knowing many times just in case. Again, our name is just too valuable.

Sadly, many servers say Sunday is the worse day to receive tips blaming church attenders who leave bad tips or no tips at all. We as believers should be the most desired people servers desire to attend. We need to be bold in our generosity. We should be known as an outflowing generous people who values all with our hearts and our hands. Let our tips reflect the generosity God desires for us to have.

Let excellence be your minimum standard.

Strive to have a good name in all things including your tips

Finally, be bold in your generosity.


If you enjoyed this post, you will also enjoy:

Riding Rollercoasters By Yourself Sucks

52 Days Off a Year

Parenting with Scissors

4 thoughts on “The Importance of Tipping 20 Percent or More

  1. Pingback: 5 Ways to Make Yourself Valuable at Work | Rowland in Life

  2. Pingback: BOLD in Your Generosity | Rowland in Life

  3. Pingback: People are Greater | Rowland in Life

  4. Pingback: Godly and Good While Driving | Rowland in Life

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.